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“MAKE IN INDIA” “MULTIPLE FINANCING OPTIONS” MAKING BUSINESS CREDITABLE “WHERE SHOULD SMB LOOK FOR FINANCE”

 
 
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“MAKE IN INDIA” “MULTIPLE FINANCING OPTIONS” MAKING BUSINESS CREDITABLE “WHERE SHOULD SMB LOOK FOR FINANCE”
by System Administrator - Monday, 25 September 2017, 2:55 AM
 

By: M.S.Yatnatti Editor and Video Journalist Bengaluru : Reportedly finding capital is becoming harder for a significant proportion of small businesses, despite the wider variety of financing options available. Even though there are more lending alternatives for small businesses than ever before, a crucial step is missing and no one is paying attention, leaving business owners increasingly frustrated over their rejections for credit lines and loans. Business owners, then, should determine where they stand and take control of the factors critical to the lenders, credit card companies and even other businesses they work with. When owners understand their scores, they have an easier loan approval experience and are empowered to grow and thrive and help the overall economy thrive as well. That way, everyone wins. When one thinks of kick-starting a business, the first place where you can look for financial support is a bank. Banks play a vital role in the growth of an enterprise. They are not only providers of credit, but also lend a hand as partners in the expansion of an enterprise. Also, they provide short-term, mid-term or long-term financing options. Crowdfunding on sites such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo can give a boost to financing a small business. These sites allow businesses to pool small investments from a number of investors instead of having to look for a single investment."

Actually Trump might be a blessing in disguise for India - it will force Indian talent to focus on solving problems in India,” said Reliance Industries Ltd. Chairman Mukesh Ambani at the NASSCOM Leadership Forum, referring to Indian information technology companies' fears that Trump's policies may result in fewer U.S. visas for their engineers.Trump can be trumped after all he is a businessman and his decision can be taken as blessing in disguise . Indian IT companies have visa independent global delivery model where it reduced the total effort onsite (at the client location) in a project from about 30% on an average to just 10%. "Andthis 10% will be delivered by local hires. Indian IT is also likely to find significant support among its US customers. The Indian software industry, has largely been responsible for building as well as maintaining the information infrastructure of most large US corporations. It plays a very critical role in the success of US corporations,that tampering with it wouldn't be easy.IT companies conducted several pilots and all of them were very successful,"The global downturn and "Buy American and hire American” theory has brought along with it new opportunities. It is for the industry to identify the opportunities and move ahead," Indian IT companies can hire American and sell American and make killing profits in America as American IT companies hire Indian and sell Indian and make killing profits in India . "Make in India American products” "The Indian industry will continue to do well if they learn that there are no easy pickings any longer." And that's true of all companies, irrespective of their size..The US was teaching all countries Globalization and now suddenly talking localization "Buy American and hire American”. Investors from around the world, including in the City of London, will be listening carefully for how America'sDonald Trump is set to sign an executive order to overhaul the H-1B & L-1 visa programmes, which let tens of thousands of Indians work in the US, drove tech stocks down and sparked speculation in the IT sector about an uncertain future. Indian business experts predict that Indian IT companies can outsmart any trade barriers created byDonald Trump as they are listening this since the days of his election campaign.India need to remember late Dewang Mehta, the chief lobbyist for India's fledgling software services industry, carried off both with aplomb, convincing businesses that at the stroke of midnight of the new millennium, their computer systems would crash because old programs measured years in two digits instead of four. The solution, he persuaded them, was to let a horde of techies from Bangalore and Hyderabad go through each line of code and fix the Y2K bug.