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“INDIA AT ITS OWN CROSSROADS” “EUROPE’S DATA PROTECTION LAW KICKS IN, THE GDPR CAME INTO FORCE FROM MAY 25 2018 IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

 
 
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“INDIA AT ITS OWN CROSSROADS” “EUROPE’S DATA PROTECTION LAW KICKS IN, THE GDPR CAME INTO FORCE FROM MAY 25 2018 IN THE EUROPEAN UNION
by System Administrator - Wednesday, 22 August 2018, 10:53 PM
 

By : M.S.Yatnatti Editor and Video Journalist Bengaluru : Reportedly Over the past few weeks, chances are you have received alerts from an assortment of online services letting you know that their privacy policies are changing. Some might be offering options where they previously didn't exist -- like a health tracker application confirming your willingness to share your data for research purposes, or a visa services website letting you know they will only send you updates if you ask. Others will be reminding you that you haven't used their service for years, and so, unless they hear otherwise, they will have to delete your login data. These alerts invariably emphasise on simpler, clearer options for how businesses collect, process and store your personal data. What has changed? These companies are likely changing their policies to comply with the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force from May 25 2018 . It's a European law, and yet several online companies are changing their privacy policies that will apply to all their users globally, irrespective of location.The General Data Protection Regulation or the GDPR is a new law that came into force in the European Union from May 25 2018 . GDPR enshrines data protection and privacy rights for European users, and holds companies handling their data, wherever they may be, liable for violations. The penalties run into hefty fines -- highest being 20 million euros or 4% of annual turnover -- whichever is greater. Facebook has sprung into action to redistribute its data-handling operations. Microsoft-owned LinkedIn has done the same. Twitter has updated its privacy policy too. Indian tech, publishing and e-commerce companies will also have to review how they handle, store and erase data. The EU law comes into force on May 25, and decrees that consumers or "data subjects” have right to erasure of their data and a right to port their data from one place to another. It also places a premium on the data subjects' consent to collection and processing of data. Although the law is being introduced in the EU, its ramifications extend the world over. That is because it is not focused on regulatory measures for tech companies, but rather on the protection of EU citizens and their data. Since internet and tech companies the world over handle data from across the globe, the consequences of breaking the law extend to them. The law was introduced in 2016, with data controllers and processors the worldover given two years, until this year's May deadline to comply. Indianswill continue to use online products and services the way you did. The EU law is not designed to protect citizens outside of it. Indian businesses handling EU user data, however, will have to take another look at the way they collect and use data or face massive fines. Industry bodies in India are attempting to handhold companies through the regulatory maze. Nasscom and the Data Security Council of India held familiarisation workshops in March in Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru. "Nasscom has also launched a GDPR Helpdesk for member companies to have their questions resolved,