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“DON’T FORWARD ‘AS RECEIVED’ IN”WHATSAPP”&TELEGRAM” SOCIAL MEDIA HAS CHANGED THE WAY MOBILE DEVICES HAVE BEEN UTILIZED FOR INFORMATION

 
 
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“DON’T FORWARD ‘AS RECEIVED’ IN”WHATSAPP”&TELEGRAM” SOCIAL MEDIA HAS CHANGED THE WAY MOBILE DEVICES HAVE BEEN UTILIZED FOR INFORMATION
by System Administrator - Sunday, 5 August 2018, 11:19 PM
 

By: M.S.Yatnatti: Editor and Video Journalist Bengaluru: Never forward 'as received' messages whose veracity you aren't sure of;Reportedly Lynch-mobs debase humanity. The reasons for their actions in the recent past have been varied: Suspicion of cow smuggling, thieving, and child trafficking. However, a common thread found in many cases has been the circulation of rumours and fake news that appeal to people's fears and bigotry on messaging platforms, especially WhatsApp. While according to reports rumours leading to lynchings and even riots are not new to India, their frequency is alarming. Digital technologies afford us greater ability to communicate and to exercise our freedom of expression more fully than ever before. They also allow the spread of rumours in greater numbers, over greater distances and with greater impunity. While child abduction rumours on WhatsApp resulted in a lynching in 2015 too, the past month has seen such rumours spread all over South India, resulting in dozens of lynchings. The difference? Increased use of the internet. How can this menace be tackled? First, we have to accept personal responsibility: Never forward 'as received' messages whose veracity you aren't sure of; chastise those who do. This is also backed by the law: the IPC, under provisions like Sections 505 and 153A, allows for prosecution of certain categories of harmful rumours and falsehoods.Second, WhatsApp's moderation-less design encourages rumour-mongering. WhatsApp implicitly discourages moderation of content in groups (eg., it only has 'administrators', not 'moderators'), unlike, say, Facebook.